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Reading the Arts

Author: Brian Kellow (page 1 of 5)

Palette: A Conversation with War Paint’s Scott Frankel and Michael Korie

Part of being a theater junkie is that we demand that the people we love feel as we do about a given work; when they don’t, we often ask ourselves what the hell is the matter with them. In the past ten or twelve years, I have often attended a new Broadway musical that seemed […]

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In Reno, a Jackpot of Big Voices

Whenever I am covering singing competitions in New York, one of the most astonishing revelations is the paucity of dramatic voices. Lyric mezzos, lyric sopranos, and lyric baritones dominate, and it’s not unusual to sit through days of auditions and not hear a single viable Verdi mezzo, Verdi baritone or even a remotely acceptable Wagnerian […]

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Past Continuous: An Interview with Alfred Allan Lewis

One of the great pleasures of all the years I have lived in New York is meeting people a generation or two before me who have had extraordinary careers in the arts. In a place like New York, this is surprisingly easy to do. Many of them I met through my job as an editor […]

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Screen and Screen Again:
Joan Fontaine, Divine and Mortal

Joan Fontaine had one of the most baffling careers of any star actress of the 1940s and ’50s. She is so breathtakingly good in a handful of her films that it is difficult to understand why she comes off as so stupefyingly phony in so many of them. After an unpromising beginning in the 1930s, […]

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Educational Initiative: an Interview with Rebekah Diaz-Fandrei

Rebekah Diaz-Fandrei is widely known as South Florida’s Opera Mom. Married to baritone Graham Fandrei, director of Magic City Opera, she is the mother of two young sons. She studied with Mimi Lerner at Carnegie-Mellon University and Maitland Peters at the Manhattan School of Music; her resume includes performances of L’Italiana in Algeri, The Rape […]

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Bewitched: a review of My Cousin Rachel

Daphne Du Maurier’s famous romantic suspense novel, My Cousin Rachel, was one of the books that sat on my parents’ shelf from the time I can remember, along with several of her others: Rebecca, and Frenchman’s Creek, and later on, Don’t Look Now. She was the kind of novelist my mother appreciated for her smooth […]

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Autumn in the Spring: Notes on the Met’s Recent Rosenkavalier

I generally observe a strict shelf life when writing about a performance I’ve just attended. I like to be in front of my keyboard as soon as possible after I’ve seen something, when my response to what I’ve seen is still churning inside me. But in the case of the Metropolitan Opera’s HD broadcast of […]

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Three Way

From June 15–18, BAM Fisher (Fishman Space) is the place to catch Three Way, a trio of one-act operas by composer Robert Paterson and librettist David Cote. The three individual acts, “Safe Word,” “The Companion,” and “Masquerade,” explore sexual fetishes and role-playing in modern life. Co-produced by Nashville Opera and American Opera Projects, Three Way bowed at […]

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Amelia Goes to the Ballo: An Interview with Soprano Tamara Wilson

Last Thursday, I attended the run-through of Florida Grand Opera’s production of Verdi’s Un Ballo in Maschera, opening at the Adrienne Arsht Center in Miami on April 29. Singing the role of Amelia was Tamara Wilson. I am not sure I have heard such an authoritatively sung Amelia since the heyday of Martina Arroyo. Wilson’s […]

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The Powers of Darkness: Dana Beth Miller in Florida Grand Opera’s Ballo

Dana Beth Miller is one of the most versatile and exciting mezzo-sopranos on the current opera scene. She is about to sing the role of the clairvoyant Ulrica in Florida Grand Opera’s production of Verdi’s Un ballo in maschera, opening April 29 at the Ziff Ballet Opera House of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the […]

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